Archive for the tag “Sustainability”

Call for donors: Clean ocean energy project in Udupi, India

Developed by Dr. Ashok Kundapur, this project seeks to harness energy from the ocean to generate clean electric power all round the year at over 80% of installed capacity, way better than any conventional power plant burning coal or Uranium. He is seeking funds to develop a fully functional prototype, through the Milaap crowdfunding platform.

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The end of the fossil fuel era and Hyderabad’s energy future

The revised version of a talk given by Soujanya Mantravadi at the Future of Energy for Hyderabad workshop held at La Makaan, Hyderabad on 24. 07. 2016, organized by Ecologise Hyderabad. It explores the implications of the end of the fossil fuel era and ways in which residents of Hyderabad can start preparing for it.

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The Paris Climate Talks: A Nepali View

Shail Shrestha writes at Local Futures: Technology transfer from the North to South has long been regarded as the path to a better life in less-developed regions of the world. But even the best and the most sustainable technology proposed in Paris would make Nepal less sustainable than it is today, leading us in the wrong direction.

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Workshop: Introduction to Permaculture and Forest Farming, Bangalore, Oct 28-30

Permaculture Patashala

When: 28-30th (Wed-Fri) Oct 2015

Where: Bhoomi Campus (Sarjapur Road) & Bhoomi Gurukul Farm, Bengaluru.
Instructor: Shri. Narsanna Koppula, Aranya Agricultural Alternatives, Telangana.
Course Fees: INR 3000 to be paid to Bhoomi College.
To register: Drop a mail to edao OR call at +91-9449051027 (limited seats).

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Announcing the second Ecologise! farm workshop

Date: November 14 -15, 2015
Venue: Suman Sangam A forest farm (village  Daddi Kamalapur (Dharwad Panaji (Goa) highway) Dharwad, Karnataka, India)
Host: Dr. Sanjeev Kulkarni


Ecologise!
Ecologise is a programme through which those living in cities can explore living in an ecologically more sensitive and sustainable manner. Specifically, it is a programme involving stay and work on an organic farm for varying periods, as a volunteer. The programme will be preceded by a weekend orientation  workshop , during which the participant may decide which farm they wish to work on, and for how long. The duration will vary according to the needs and land cycles of each farm. There will be a few break periods’ during which participants can go home or travel. It is possible that participants may not be in a position to commit for a longer period. They can still attend the orientation workshop. Read more…

Event: Bhoomi Utsav 2015 Oct 2, Bangalore

Bhoomi College

Go Organic! Tune in with Mother Earth!  

Date: Oct 2  2015   Time: 10 am to 6 pm        

Venue: the new Bhoomi Campus, (New Gate, Before Prakriya, Chikkanayakana Halli Rd) under the sky and trees Read more…

Special: Questioning the UNs Sustainable Development Goals

Sustainable Development Goals: Can we pull them off?
Catch News
The 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) will replace the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). The new set has 169 targets. Critics believe these are well-intentioned, but range from grandiose (end hunger) to peripheral (promote sustainable tourism) to flat-out impossible (full and productive employment and decent work for all). Nevertheless, India is committing to some tough goals. Heres a quick reckoner of what they are and a reality check on where we stand.

The Sustainable Development Goals: A Siren and Lullaby for Our Times
Thomas Pogge & Alnoor Ladha, Occupy.com
The SDGs inequality goal (target 10.1) allows current trends of income concentration to continually increase until 2029 before they start to decline. This totally ignores the structure of our economic system which creates inequality in the very rules that enforce and articulate the current distribution of wealth.

What if everything the SDGs are premised on is just wrong?
Martin Kirk, African Arguments
At the upcoming UN General Assembly, we are all about to be told some stories as part of a big of the “world’s largest advertising campaign” by the UN, NGOs, governments and large corporations to sell us on the new global plan to tackle poverty. It’s up to each of us to determine whether these stories are full of hope we can believe in or just a big serving of marketing and spin.

The UNs Sustainability Plan Is Doomed, According to Linguistic Analysis
Nafeez Ahmed
A report circulated to UN officials argues that the entire SDG process has been fundamentally compromised by powerful corporations with an interest in sustaining business as usual. Commissioned by Washington DC-based nonprofit TheRules.org, a global activist network campaigning to address the root causes of poverty, the report is based on frame analysis—a scientific method examining linguistic and conceptual patterns to reveal how people define, construct, and process information.

Sustained economic growth: United Nations mistake the poison for the cure
Samuel Alexander, The Conversation
The defining flaw in the United Nations’ agenda is the naïve assumption that “sustained economic growth” is the most direct path to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals. This faith in the god of growth is fundamentally misplaced. It has been shown, for example, that for every $100 in global growth merely $0.60 is directed toward resolving global poverty. Not only is this an incredibly inefficient pathway to poverty alleviation, it is environmentally unsupportable.

Five reasons to think twice about the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals
Jason Hickel, London School of Economics
People aren’t getting excited about the SDGs because they know that business as usual isn’t going to deliver the new economy we so desperately need. In this sense, the goals are not only a missed opportunity, they are actively dangerous: they lock in the global development agenda for the next 15 years around a failing economic model that requires urgent and deep structural changes, and they kick the hard challenge of real transformation down the road for the next generation to deal with – by which time it may be too late.

What the SDGs Could Learn from Indigenous Peoples
Fionuala Cregan, Common Dreams
Across the world, Indigenous Peoples are at the forefront of struggles to defend the Earth’s remaining habitats from the relentless advance of extractive industries, from open air mining, to oil driling to and single crop industrial agriculture. Unfortunately, the new SDGs offer them little by way of support.

Event: TARAgram Yatra on India Post 2015 : Investing in Sustainability

www.taragramyatra.org

TARAgram Yatra 2015 is an annual event that holds global multi-stakeholder consultation,organised by the Development Alternatives in partnership with Technology & Action Rural Advancement (TARA), Heinrich Böll Stiftung / Foundations (HBF), OXFAM, Deutsche Gesellschaft for Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ), and the Department for International Development (DFID).

TARAgram Yatra brings together practitioners and policy makers from India and across the world to discuss germane issues of sustainability and identify what can we do more and different such that India transforms to a greener, more sustainable, resilient and inclusive nation. Read more…

Paper: Sustainability Dynamics of Resource Use and Economic Growth

A Discussion on Sustaining the Dynamic Linkages between Renewable Natural Resources and the Economic System
Mihir Mathur & Swati Agarwal, TERI
systemIn this paper , we have used System Dynamics to test three popular policy options for sustaining Economic Growth, 1) Resource Efficiency, 2) Resource Efficiency and Green Growth, 3) Doubling of Resource Base due to technological advancement. The model outcomes indicate that the above policies fail to avoid the overshoot and fall of the economy due to resource depletion, but are successful in delaying it.

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First Ecologise! workshop at Nakre, near Udupi, Karnataka

DSCN1948

Ecologise is a programme through which those living in cities can explore living in an ecologically more sensitive and sustainable manner. Specifically, it is a programme involving stay and work on an organic farm for varying periods, as a volunteer. The programme will be preceded by a weekend orientation workshop , during which the participant may decide which farm they wish to work on, and for how long. The duration will vary according to the needs and land cycles of each farm.

There will be a few break periods’ during which participants can go home or travel. It is possible that participants may not be in a position to commit for a longer period. They can still attend the orientation workshop . This workshop will also introduce the volunteer to practices one can incorporate in one’s life to live a more healthy and a less resource-intensive lifestyle. Read more…

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