Archive for the tag “Sagar Dhara”

Sagar Dhara: The climate challenge is deeper than technology

DEVELOPMENT AND DISARMAMENT ROUNDTABLE

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Technology’s role in a climate solution
If the world is to avoid “severe, widespread, and irreversible [climate] impacts,” carbon emissions must decrease quickly—and achieving such cuts, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, depends in part on the availability of “key technologies.” But arguments abound against faith in technological solutions to the climate problem. Electricity grids may be ill equipped to accommodate renewable energy produced on a massive scale. Many technological innovations touted in the past have failed to achieve practical success. Even successful technologies will do little good if they mature too late to help avert climate disaster. Below, experts from India, the United States, and Bangladesh address the following questions: To what extent can the world depend on technological innovation to address climate change? And what promising technologies—in generating, storing, and saving energy, and in storing greenhouse gases or removing them from the atmosphere—show most potential to help the world come to terms with global warming? Read more…

Sagar Dhara: Response to Alan Rusbridger

Pot calling the kettle black will not mitigate global warming, eco-socialism can

— by Sagar Dhara

(This article was originally published on Frontierweekly.com on 2 June, 2018)

climate 2
In a recent interview published in The Hindu, Alan Rusbridger, the former editor-in-chief of the Guardian, expressed the fear that India “is going to burn a vast amount of dirty coal in very inefficient ways, and that could be really devastating.”  He advises India to use more solar energy.

By withholding inconvenient facts that developed countries emitted 78% of carbon dioxide (CO2) released since 1750 (historic emissions), Rusbridger is like the pot that called the kettle black.  Per the Guardian’s website UK’s per capita historic emissions of 1,127 T, is the second highest in the world, and forty times that of India’s. Read more…

The IMF’s “shocking” estimate of fossil fuel costs: There’s more to the story

Sajai Jose

Credit: CGP Grey/Flickr, CC-BY 2.0
Credit: CGP Grey/FlickrCC-BY 2.0

Recently, when an International Monetary Fund research paper revealed that the actual cost of fossil fuel usage for 2018 was a staggering US$ 5.3 trillion (approx. 340 lakh crore rupees), it made headlines worldwide, though it went largely unreported in India.

What accounts for the bulk of this figure are the hidden costs of fossil fuel use – referred to as ‘externalities’ in economics – calculated in monetary value. Most of it consists of damages inflicted by fossil fuel use on public health (for eg. deaths from air pollution) and the environment (global warming). Read more…

More video interviews by Mansoor Khan

Here are some more additions to Peak Oil India member Mansoor Khan’s ongoing series of  video interviews with experts in various fields from ecology to energy to economics. The interviews take off from the themes covered in Mansoor’s book, The Third Curve: The End of Growth. As We Know It!.

View more videos at: The Third Curve YouTube channel 

Claude Alvarez
Claude Alvares is an environmentalist based in Goa, India. He is the editor of the Other India Press publication based in India and the Director of the Goa Foundation, an environmental monitoring action group. He is a member of the Goa Coastal Zone Management Authority of the Ministry of Environment and Forests (MoEF). and the Supreme Court Monitoring Committee (SCMC) on Hazardous Wastes constituted by the Supreme Court of India.
Read more…

Workshop: Conservation, Environmental Protection and Equity (Vizag, 28-29 March)

Andhra University, Visakhapatnam, 28-29 March 2018

A one and a half day workshop titled Ecological Resources Conservation, Environmental Protection and Equity Movements will be held on 2829 March as part of the XXXVIII Indian Social Science Congress to be held in Andhra University, Visakhapatnam between 29 March and 2 April 2018. The focal theme of the congress is Knowledge systems, scientific temper and the Indian people.

Objectives
The object of this workshop is to explore the possibility of finding common ground for the three types of people’s movements to dialogue and work together and to understand the practical linkages between local issues on which movements take place and their global causes.

Participants
The workshop is largely for activists from Andhra Pradesh and Telangana and will be conducted in Telugu. The activists should have participated in struggles against inequality or destructive development projects, or participated in conservation movements. Interested activists from other states may attend. The organizers will assist them to have whisper translation done. Read more…

Living in a World with Limited Resources – Sirsi, Feb 21

Date: 21 Feb 2018 , Time: 3.00pm-6.00pm
Venue: A.V Hall, Don Bosco High School, Sirsi
Speakers: Mansoor Khan and Sagar Dhara

Growth is considered to be the fundamental characteristic of any healthy economic system. This growth is fuelled by the easy availability of fossil fuel, which is a limited natural resource formed over millions of years. We have now reached a stage where half the available source of Oil has been consumed. Exponential growth continues, but the source of fuel that was driving it is half empty. What will happen now? What will happen to the economic systems that depended on this fuel? What will happen to the stock markets, to the manufacturing industry, to our agricultural sector, to transport, to everything that we have got used to? What will happen to our lives?

This talk by two experts will provide us a clearer understanding about a topic that mainstream media and even economists have refused to talk about. They attempt to unravel the complex principles of Energetics to explain why the current rates of growth based on fossil fuels cannot be sustained any longer. They will point out the signs of economic collapse that awaits us in the not-too-distant future. A historical exploration of how we got into the current mess, will be presented. Some alternative paths to avert this disaster will also be discussed. The presentations will be followed by an open discussion.

For more information, contact:
George Varghese +91.9481278348 grgvrghs@gmail.com
Dr Giridhar +91.9448115363 girisirsi@gmail.com
Vinish Gupta +91.8762071817 gupta.vinish@gmail.com

Sagar Dhara: Keep the Climate, Change the Economy

Contrasting outcomes of recent global warming meetings

Sagar Dhara

Two recent meetings on global warming, one scientific and the other political, are of great public interest as they have a bearing on human society’s future course to become a sustainable global community. The meetings contrasted each other in the clarity of their outcomes.

The first meeting was held by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), a body of over 2,000 scientists. IPCC released its fifth assessment’s synthesis report in Copenhagen end-October 2014. The report states unequivocally that “Human influence on the climate system is clear.” Further, it warns that the emission of another 1,000 Giga tonnes1 (Gt) of carbon dioxide (CO2), referred to as the carbon space, is likely to raise average global surface temperatures by 2oC above pre-industrial times. This is considered dangerous to the environment and human society.

Since the industrial revolution began in the mid-18th Century, humans have used 35% of the known 1,700 Gt of conventional fossil fuel reserves, and cut a third of the then existing 60 million km2 of forests to emit 2,000 GtCO2. The consequent 0.85oC average global temperature rise over pre-industrial times has triggered significant changes in the physical, biological and human environments. For example, rainfall variation has increased, extreme weather events are more frequent, pole-ward migration of species is noticeable and their extinction rate is higher, human health, food and water security are at greater risk, crop yield variations are higher, a 19 cm mean sea rise and a 40% reduction in Arctic’s summer ice extent have occurred over the last century, glaciers have shrunk by 275 Gt per annum in the last two decades, and social conflicts have increased. Read more…

Upcoming events in Hyderabad

DISCUSSION – JAN 17
“The shape of post carbon society and the hazy road to get there”
Time and date: 6.30 pm, Sat, 17 Jan 2018
Place: Cerana Foundation office, D-101 Highrise Apartments, Lower Tank Bund Road (next to Courtyard Marriott Hotel), Hyderabad. Tel: 2753 6128.
Message from the organiser (Sagar Dhara): Some of our friends were in Lima during the 20th COP meet on climate negotiations that happened last month, a topic we discussed in our last meeting. If these friends are available, we can have a short report on what happened in Lima before we start discussing the above topic.
Please let me know if you are in. And you are welcome to bring along others who may be interested in this subject or forward this info to them. You could also stay back to discuss the more contentious issues over a dinner (makki ki roti and sarson da saag for anyone?) at the nearby dhaba.
For more information on the topic, contact Sagar Dhara at: sagdhara@gmail.com
SEMINAR – JAN 23-24
Seminar on water conservation at Pious College, near Habsiguda Junction. Those interested in the subject may contact Ms Prabhalata at biobotstpious@gmail.com and request her for an invitation for the 2 day seminar (23-24 Jan) on Water conservation.  There will be a talk by Sagar Dhara at 12 noon on 23rd Jan titled: “To conserve water bodies, all three global commons – water, land and atmosphere – need to be conserved“.
CONFERENCE
A conference on Climate Change will be held at HCU in the first week of February. Email Sagar Dhara at sagdhara@gmail.com for details.

Video: The Third Curve interviews by Mansoor Khan

Peak Oil India member Mansoor Khan has been doing a series of short video interviews with experts in various fields from ecology to energy to economics. The interviews take off from the themes covered in his book, The Third Curve: The End of Growth. As We Know It!. Some of the prominent names interviewed so far are Vandana Shiva, Ashish Kothari and Sunita Narain (featured in the video above), apart from POI members Sagar Dhara, Nagraj Adve and Mihir Mathur. Mansoor’s YouTube channel also has a short video which neatly summarises the book’s contents.

Visit The Third Curve YouTube channel 

Two Talks with Bill McKibben – 7th November, Hyderabad

Bill McKibben, American environmentalist, author and journalist who has written extensively on the impact of global warming, heads 350.org, which recently organised the People’s Climate March in New York, attended by an estimated 400,000 people. McKibben is the winner of the 2013 Gandhi Prize, Right Livelihood Award or the Alternative Nobel, and the Thomas Merton Prize. He holds honorary degrees from 18 colleges and universities. Foreign Policy listed him under their inaugural list of the world’s 100 most important global thinkers, and the Boston Globe called him “probably America’s most important environmentalist.”

Talk 1. Dirt-E-Talk,  7th November, Telugu University

The ‘Dirt-E-Talks’ series is an initiative to break the myth that fossil fuel based development is the only way for India to prosper. ‘Dirt-E-Talks’ is a small effort to kick start a mainstream discussion, largely amongst the youth, that will challenge the status quo of how India perceives and acts on its energy needs. These seminars will not only introduce important concepts like energy equity, unsustainable growth parameters, economic impacts of dependence on fossil fuel, but will also provide a platform for audiences to learn and interact with communities resisting dirty energy projects. Stories from frontline communities will leave a long lasting impact on people, urging them to think about injustice and inequalities arising out of current systems of generating energy.

Date :   Friday 7th November 2014
Venue: NTR Auditorium, Telugu University
Time :  5PM-8 PM

Online Registration, Confirmation & Seat Reservation: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1py6R2SFpOgQtNf1Zzpnc6-D9aphvJMycRBhOvGqJbeI/viewform

Talk 2. Overcoming Energy Poverty without Dirty Energy, 7th November, St. Pious College for Women

Panel: Sri V Rajamani, Former Secretary, MoEF, Prof Kodandaram, Sagar Dhara (POI Founder-Member), Dr Thimma Reddy, K Raghu and othersDate: 7 November 2014 Time: 11:00 AM – 1:00 PM
Venue: St. Pious College for Women, Snehapuri Colony (Behind IICT, Habshiguda-Nacharam Road).
For more information, contact Babu Rao Kalapala at: baburaokalapala@gmail.com

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